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Unprecedented dinosaur discovery made on the Isle of Wight

The Brachiosaur vertebra with footprint.

The Brachiosaur vertebra with footprint.

a County Press reporter

editor@iwcp.co.uk

Friday, May 19, 2017 - 14:29

DINOSAUR experts on the Isle of Wight have made a 'completely unprecedented' discovery.
The footprint, which has been preserved on another dinosaur bone, is believed to be the first of its kind.
The discovery will be go on display at the Dinosaur Expeditions Centre near Brighstone on Saturday May 25.
It was found by palaeontologist, and director of the centre, Oliver Mattsson in October 2015 on Brook Beach, but has only just been completed following a fresh discovery by a fossil collector.
While dinosaur footprints are well known on the Isle of Wight, to date no complete dinosaur footprints have been found on dinosaur bones, because most bones are too small to preserve the large footprints.
When Oliver discovered the large Brachiosaur dinosaur vertebra, it was taken to the centre and cleaned by volunteers.
But it was one of the museum's volunteers, Ashley Siebert, who noticed the distinctive pattern of a dinosaur footprint on the surface of the bone.
"When Ashley told me there was a dinosaur footprint on the surface I thought he was joking. There was obvious crush damage on the surface but this is quite normal for dinosaur bones. However, it was only when he pointed out the distinctive three-toed pattern, that I realised he was being serious," said Oliver.
"In nearly twenty-five years of collecting dinosaur bones I have never heard of a complete dinosaur footprint preserved on a dinosaur bone before, it is completely unprecedented," he added.
When the vertebra was found, it was incomplete - but last month, Michael Wall, a local fossil collector, informed Oliver that he thought he'd found the missing pieces on Brook beach.
After they discovered the pieces were part of the Brachiosaur vertebra, Michael offered the pieces to the museum so it could be completed.
The Brachiosuar vertebra was probably lying in a shallow layer of soft mud, when a small meat-eating dinosaur walked on top of it, crushing the surface of the bone in the shape of its foot.

dinosaur bone and footprint

The discovery was made on Brook Beach.

 


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