Lambing season caution

By a County Press reporter

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

 

DOG walkers have been urged to keep their animals on leads when near sheep during lambing season.

The British Veterinary Association (BVA) said ewes were particularly vulnerable at this time of year, as they prepare to give birth.

BVA president and vet Robin Hargreaves said: "Even dogs who are usually calm and good natured can become very excitable and difficult to control when faced with livestock. Tragically this can lead to chasing, attacks and fatalities for sheep and other animals.

"Over the coming months ewes in the field are likely to be heavily pregnant or to have recently given birth. Chasing and worrying can have severe consequences at this time, leading to serious injuries, early labour and fatalities."

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by Mike Crowe

18th February 2014, at 16:40:33

Debbie I agree with you about Chinese Lanterns for another reason. I am half way through writing a book about a fire completely destroying a business, not by Chinese Lanterns, but by another accident. The consequences, the blame, the heart aches are all there, looking at it from lots of different angles. Guilt, Business, Family, Financial and others as well.

But I bet those having fun setting off these things off don't think and consider.

.

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by Debbie Hollebon

18th February 2014, at 15:32:58

Whilst on the subject of animal safety it would be a good thing if Chinese lanterns and balloon releases were banned. What goes up, comes down. The frames get chopped up in silage or eaten directly and makes holes in intestines killing the animal after a great deal of pain. Another problem is balloon releases, again what falls to the ground, particularly those balloons with plastic stoppers choke animals. Cows especially are curious animals that use their tongues to investigate things they find in the field. A friend of mine farms up on the downs outside Petersfield. Lanterns and balloons released on the island and Portsmouth land on his higher fields as they lose height.

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by James McAdder

18th February 2014, at 12:51:24

Many dog owners seem to think that its OK to not clean up after their dog has pooped in a field, but there is a serious and incurable cattle disease (Neospora caninum) for which dogs are the major carrier and is spread in their faeces.

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by Tim Muncaster

18th February 2014, at 12:33:55

Strange turn-around, LM
"I am not one for keeping wild animals (or any animal) in captivity"

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by Keven Ball

18th February 2014, at 11:59:02

I am glad others here are agreeing that all dogs should be supervised and kept on leads. As Lee says if you want the dog to have a microchip they are free to get as an article on here stated the other day. Let us hope dogs are kept on the leads as a result of this article.

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by David Blackford

18th February 2014, at 11:44:16

Right Keven - I think that is what the message means - I'm sure ALL responsible dog keepers will take obey the rules. - Farmers do have the legal right to shoot dogs attacking their animals.

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by Keven Ball

18th February 2014, at 11:15:40

I feel that dogs should be kept on leads in public places due to them running over to other animals or people!

Any views or opinions presented in the comments above are solely those of the author and do not represent those of the Isle of Wight County Press.

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