Report criticises mental health unit

By Jon Moreno

Sunday, November 10, 2013

 

PATIENTS at Sevenacres mental health unit may be at risk of not receiving the right care and treatment because of failing systems, according to a report by health watchdog inspectors.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) highlighted shortcomings in patients’ care planning and the way staff communicated with relatives and carers concerned with the welfare and care patients’ received.

A spokesman for the Isle of Wight NHS Trust said it welcomed the report and it was looking at ways to improve its service.

Inspectors found although patients’ dignity and independence had been respected, their views about the way their care had been managed or delivered had not been taken into account.

All the patients inspectors spoke to said they were unclear about their care plans and were not always involved in decisions about their care or treatment.

Some patients could be at risk of not receiving the right care to support their needs because of the varied quality of care plans, and staff accepted care records were unsatisfactory, the report said.

Inspectors said the unit met the required standard for safeguarding patients from abuse, there were enough staff to keep patients safe and meet their health and welfare needs, and staff were properly trained and supervised.

However, concerns over patients’ safety and welfare were highlighted after staff were unable to state how many of those detained under the Mental Health Act had been offered or provided with an independent mental health advocate.

The views of patients’ relatives and those with an interest in patients’ welfare had not been taken seriously, the report stated. Senior management at the unit conceded communication with patients’ relatives, following numerous complaints, needed to improve.

Systems to monitor and assess the quality of the services were not robust, with nothing in place to audit records that would identify, assess and manage risks to the health, safety and welfare of patients at the unit, the report concluded.

The trust spokesman said the report recognised patients felt safe and happy with their care, and staff were helpful and friendly.

He added: "We have a range of work under way to ensure we are more systematic about assessing and monitoring the quality of service.

"We are also looking at ways to improve the involvement of patients, carers and families in the welfare of patients."

Reporter: jonm@iwcpmail.co.uk

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by Keith McNallyohanly

10th November 2013, at 11:41:24

Karen Baker's priority is making the trust foundation status so wages and staff and be cut and services outsourced.

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by David Blackford

10th November 2013, at 10:01:46

It is easy for Inspectors to criticise but actually DOING the caring for patients cannot always be easy, especially if there are staff shortages in these times of cuts.
I imagine that Inspectors are paid an awful lot more than carers - perhaps 1 Inspectors salary would pay for - how many carers?

Any views or opinions presented in the comments above are solely those of the author and do not represent those of the Isle of Wight County Press.

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